Online Artist Residency

This December, the WOC Online Artist Residency was hosting seven international artists - Amalia Galdona Broche, Anikó Sáfrán , Maryam Khaleghiyazd, Chelsea Stewart, Lizzie Essi , Margaret R. Thompson and Siddharth Pathak. Below you can see their latest works created during the month in the virtual art program.

During the next days, you can watch the artist talks on IGTV @worldofcoresidency

  • Alex Braidwood – Tuesday (08.12) 17:00 UTC
  • Janine-Annette Littmann – Wednesday (09.12) 17:00 UTC
  • Juan Pablo Medina – Friday (11.12) 17:00 UTC

For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram and Facebook

Online exhibition space

Vol.6, October 2020

This October, the WOC Online Artist Residency was hosting four international artists -Anna Rose, Joshua Unikel, Megan James Goodman, Re Philips. Below you can see their latest works created during the month in the virtual art program.

On Friday, November -nd at 00:00 UTC ( 00am EST and 00am CST) you can watch the artist talk of Name and Name on IGTV @worldofcoresidency

For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram and Facebook

Online Artist Residency
Virtual Exhibition Vol.8
December 2020

Until 25th June, you can see the newly created artworks by the artists-in-residency Elaine T. Nguyen, Joanna Pottle, Crystal Marshal and Adrianna Kinal - who have participated in the WOC Online Artist Residency Program during April and May 2021.

During the next days, you can watch the artist talks on IGTV @worldofcoresidency

  • Adrianna Kinal – Saturday (June 5th) 14:00 UTC
  • Crystal Marshall & Elaine T. Nguyen - Saturday (June 5th) 18:00 UTC
  • Joanna Pottle – Sunday (June 6th) 14:00 UTC

For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram, Facebook and check our website.

Dorothy (Image)

Mixed Media Makeup Collage on Canvas

36″x36″

Play Video

Dorothy (video)

Elizabeth Taylor (Image)

Mixed Media Makeup Collage on Canvas

48″x48″

Play Video

Elizabeth (Video)

Kim Unfinished Work (Image)

Eyeshadow on paper on Canvas

36″x36″

Blackbody, Above Water

Soap, Ink, Foam, Emboss powder, Glass, Glue, Mirror

7″x18″

2021

Blackbody Emergent I

Soap, Ink, Foam, Emboss powder, Glass, Glue

6″ x 6″

2021

Blackbody Emergent II

Soap, Ink, Foam, Emboss powder, Glass, Glue

6.5″ x 6.5″

2021

Blackbody Emergent II

Soap, Ink, Foam, Emboss powder, Glass, Glue

6.5″ x 6.5″

2021

Blackbody, Encapsulation I

Oil, glass, Emboss powder and Ink on paper

26″ x 16.5″

2021

Blackbody, Encapsulation II

Oil, glass, Emboss powder and Ink on paper

25.5″ x 16.5″

2021

Blackbody, Encapsulation III

Oil, glass, Emboss powder and Ink on paper

25.5″ x 17″

2021

Play Video

I’m Tired of It (series) 20 pieces, paper, shredded books*

fabric, string, acrylic, and synthetic beads

~35×45 inches (~7×7 inches per piece)

The More I Love the Less I Share

Cyanotype on Canvas

40” x 100”

2021

Detail:

Stones painted to become wishing stones

(perpetual foreigner)

Cyanotype on Canvas

34″ x 58″

2021

(perpetual foreigner)

Cyanotype on Canvas

34″ x 58″

2021

What is it like to be as Pale as the Moon?

Embroidery on dyed canvas, chains

Triptych, 23” x 66”, 23” x 70”, 23” x 66”

2021

From Silver Screen to Digital Screen
By Adrianna Kinal

During my two-month World of Co. art residency, I continued working with makeup as a medium. As well as on portraits that are part of my “Silver Screen to Digital Screen Beauty” series. The art residency program helped me to explore new ideas, new techniques, and to better articulate the stories of the women I’m painting and represent those stories through my portraits of them.

The first piece I completed was “Dorothy,” inspired by the tragedies and triumphs of movie star Dorothy Dandridge. I created her portrait by collaging multi-mixed media layers to reflect these parts of her story. I painted with a Beauty Blender, creating a blurred look – sort of, like a nod to how much Dorothy “blended” into Hollywood’s beauty standards of that time. In contrast, the vivid makeup glitter and Swarovski crystals represent how much of a brilliant dancer, singer, and influential movie star she was.

I completed “Elizabeth,” inspired by the glamourous movie star Elizabeth Taylor. I painted her portrait with makeup and collaged multi-mixed media layers. Her vivid red lips are 3-D solidified gel containing eyeshadow applied to the canvas. I also used diamond dust in her hair to literally and figuratively reflect Elizabeth’s love of diamonds. She was a brilliant actress, a devoted philanthropist whose passionate spirit and piercing looks came through on the biggest of big screens.

Currently, I’m working on my unfinished piece “Kim,” inspired by Kim Kardashian. This is the first piece in the series depicting a modern-day beauty influencer. Inspired by her fame via the digital screen, I’m painting 1″ paper squares with makeup then pasted onto a large canvas. It’s a nod to the millions of pixels that comprise a computer or phone screen. This process is leading me to create a less defined-looking image contrasted against my other artworks that are bold, precise, and controlled.

Adrianna Kinal
Mixed media artist, USA

Adrianna Kinal is a professional mixed media portrait artist based in Los Angeles. She earned her Fashion Design degree from FIDM and worked for 15 years in the apparel industry before switching to an art career. Her fashion experience influences her portraits, where she employs processes unique to the apparel industry. These include hand embroideries, screen printing, appliqués, and beading. Kinal is currently working on a body of work exploring beauty notions inspired by the famed Hollywood makeup artist Max Factor’s story. She is experimenting with makeup as a painting medium and collaging photos, painting and embellishing silver screen movie stars with modern-day makeup techniques. These textures captivate the viewer’s attention while the subject’s gaze confronts. Her use of multiple-layered collage questions whether the person portrayed is hiding or enhancing their appearance with makeup. Integrating past beauty icons with the present leads to her titling the series “From the Silver Screen to the Digital Screen”. Kinal works with individual clients on custom commissions. Her artworks are in private collections in the United States, Canada, the UK, and the United Emirates. To date, she has created over 300 portraits. Her artwork continues to be published and featured in galleries and museums globally.

Blackbody
By Crystal Marshall

The blackbody series is a continuation of a theme I’ve been working on for about a year. I investigated and explored the theme sculpturally this time, which was quite different for me. I aimed to utilize materials that would suggest a continuum from previous paintings. I explored feelings of entrapment, rebirth, emergence, and ascension. Blackbody represents the essence of the human spirit transitioning from a terrestrial experience to that of cosmic origin and infinite existence. The works embody the notion of returning to one’s beginnings after a long and tireless journey. The terrestrial realm is depicted as a melting white emission that has a powerful gravitational pull but to fall apart. It is a symbol of the transient and transformative nature of our pain, trials, and tribulations. The blackbody is a prismatic being, encapsulating all colors of the light spectrum making it resilient and enduring. The work is influenced and inspired by the following passage, “He reached down from on high and took hold of me; he drew me out of deep waters. “

Crystal Marshall
Visual artist, USA

“My work explores the use of narrative to evoke emotional connections that reference all aspects of life. Through symbolism and allegory, I refer to what lies beneath the surface. Through the use of varying imagery of my choosing, it allows me to explore imaginative realms that defy logic but are directly influenced by life’s experiences. I also investigate different themes that affect people from all walks of life, concerning life’s trials and tribulations, which include hostility, victimization, exclusion, oppression, and withdrawal, all of which I believe ties into spirituality.”

faces in spaces
By Joanna Pottle

An experimental installation + video project, accompanied by a digital visual archival journal by joanna pottle with world of co (woc) residency in april – may 2021.

“faces in spaces” is a visual memoryscape exploration into a year of pandemic social isolation: the fragility of time, the blurriness of memory, and mundane repetition through an ambiguous lens of uncertainty and discomfort. this piece is a futile attempt to capture a glimpse of the complexity and nuance of pandemic life — life experienced through a screen, a sense of surveillance – of being observed and being the observer – of gazing out windows, the hum of distant traffic, and an acute, inherit solitude. there is an awareness of collective humanity, but without any tangible contact with other human beings. mimicking a visual nostalgic, historical archival process, the work suggests that the remembrance of this year is just as fragile a roll of tape already disintegrating.

Joanna Pottle
Visual Artist, USA

Joanna Pottle is a visual artist, researcher, educator, and curator. Her studio practice combines abstract mixed media techniques of painting, printmaking, drawing, and installations with investigations of vulnerability, memory and remembrance, courage, empathy, (re)negotiate previously untold or unheard narratives, bridging the tangible and intangible, cultural heritage, cross-cultural understanding, healing and peacebuilding, and philology and semantics. She is a recent US Fulbright Student Researcher alumane to Poland (2019-2020) and currently resides in Krakow, Poland, earning a MA in European Studies Programme, Central and Eastern European Studies: Research Track to focus on topics of cultural heritage and art & culture at the Jagiellonian University. She is also conducting a grant project through the US Embassy in Poland, “Solidarity Project/Projekt Solidarność as a virtual exchange between American and Polish artists to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic crisis (@solidarityartproject)

Monsters and other friends
By Gail Winbury

What is meaning. Why do we do what we do, what is it that makes life simple or makes it complex. Why and what does it mean? These are the questions I cherish. I started this residency with a lack, with not knowing even what the questions were, with a malaise that strikes an artist when a body of work is done , we are tired, and know not what is next.

Some call it “creative block, others the emptiness before that which will spill out next. It had been months of trying to make art, going to the studio, where I felt lost and uncertain. What is to come next ?. Still this whole year, I never lost the discipline of making art. Since the last two months spent with my fellow residents, I still have no answers. What I have gained is an excitement about making art, a new community of artists and an ability to work longer in the studio. I trust in time the rest will come.

I began three bodies of work during the residency. One is a continuation of paintings started December/January. Big gestures, large physical movement, bold, strong, emotional, assured oil paintings. Another series, a quiet voice, pared down. A language of silence, of minimal, of what is not there. A different aesthetic. The third, my collage practice which I always carry in scraps of paintings, drawings and maps.

Snowstorm upon snowstorm broke my practice, interrupting painting. But so too there was also an ennui, a wish to work small, intimately and quietly ,to conserve. The past year, for us all has been monstrous and exhausting, it’s also been a time of connection. Four weeks ago, it was knowing that I was about to receive the second vaccine, allowing me to paint the exhaustion and relief.

Gail Winbury
Painter, USA

As we are amalgams of our history, so my art is parallel. The materials and process I use combine to emphasize the layers that make us human. It is my task to put into visual language, that which dare not be uttered aloud.

One a bitterly cold and gray day, in 2014, I returned from Woodstock, New York. Walking into the studio, I was overwhelmed by the bright vibrant colors of my oil paintings. Having no idea why, I suddenly stopped using warm colors, painting only in blues and blacks. Two weeks later it was the anniversary of my parents’ deaths. For two years, my art concerned aging, death and the ensuing losses that come with time’s passage. In another series, I struggled with the male gaze in art. I loathed de Kooning’s depiction of women as aggressive slashes, gorgons and medusa. Yet I was influenced by his work. Taking back his luscious pinks and salmons and strong gesture, I painted a series about female sexuality from an empathic viewpoint.

The recent work,“ The Other Side”, is based on my childhood memories. Each painting uses one memory and translates it through color, gesture, texture and form. Large canvases intimidate by their sheer size recreating a child/parent relationship. Creating a veiled distance cold wax reveals, distorts and shields history. Brushwork mirrors the fragmented way we recall the past. The gestures of the brushes, knives and hands, suggest movement, activity and spontaneity implying that the story is occurring now. These paintings are layered, parts obscured, appearing as faint ghosts of color or line. It is as if truth is surely hidden or tucked somewhere away.

My art stems from sources personal, societal or in the natural world. However, ultimately the work speaks of a world deeply emotional, psychological and universal.

Experiments in Time and Density
By Janine-Annette Littmann

Experiments in Time and Density is a collection of in-progress studies that explore formal and metaphoric the relationship between time and density as a mechanism to document my experience during the tumultuous past nine months. Referencing Henri Bergson’s concept of la durée ― that time is experienced qualitatively as a continuous sensation, as felt through the act of tracing one’s finger along a line ― I employ various mediums to examine how time appears to halts, skips, yet unflinchingly continues to evolve.

The Paper Negative is an analogue photograph that I took early in the summer. It is an image that frequently returns in my thoughts, and as such, I chose it as an emblem that anchors my subsequent explorations.

The Sketch marks my initial investigation into transposing the photograph’s imagery into other visual mediums.

The 2 hr Handstitching Study represents my prologued tactile study of the Paper Negative’s textures and density.

For Cyano-photograms Density Study, I use my textile as a negative to produce a new photographic print. This print reveals an inversed image: highlighting the support stitching, hidden threads, and alternative perspectives; hence, accentuating the relationship between time and accumulative density.

Lastly, for the Minute Line drawing Study, I drew one continuous line for a series of incrementally long durations― ranging from 1 to 104 minutes ― thus linking the sentiments of boredom and creative futility to the built-up social aggravations that surround me.

Altogether, these initial studies form testaments for the tensions and suspended sentiments that mark these present days in which we live.

Janine-Annette Littmann
Visual Artist, Canada

Janine-Annette Littmann uses photography, textiles, and drawings to investigate how our interactions with the natural environment reflect our internal thoughts and social values. Her artworks purposefully re-enact everyday activities including gardening, sewing, documenting, tracing, and mapping in an attempt to understand how these activities symbolise profound philosophical questions and psychological needs.

Janine-Annette Littmann is a Canadian artist who has lived in Vancouver, Montréal, Iqaluit and currently resides in Winnipeg. She has most recently exhibited at La Maison des Artistes Visuels Francophones and the C2 Centre for Craft.

Dear,
By Elaine T. Nguyen

This body of work is a love letter to women of color who come of age while wrestling with the inner conflict of being themselves and desperately wanting to be the white standard. The pieces speak about the reality of entering into womanhood through a body that is not considered beautiful or precious. The perpetual foreigner, the perpetually fetishized, the perpetual pains that come with discovering how differently the world interacts with us. These works are suspended, desperate to float weightless among clouds yet are weighed down by chains and stones. The embroidery, dyes, and fabrics reference femininity and the words tie to vulnerability. The poems lack answers, admitting to hurts that time has not changed, revealing the hard learned truth that there will never be an understanding, just an acceptance.

Elaine T. Nguyen
Artist & curator, USA

Elaine T. Nguyen is an artist, curator and community organizer working in San Francisco, CA. Her work explores the intersection between love and mental health. Capturing and commemorating different moments in her life, she uses art as a means of evaluation and expression of the self. Her work is confessional, exposing, and vulnerable, ultimately created with the intent to connect, share and begin conversations with her audience on personal memories and struggles.