Online Artist Residency

This December, the WOC Online Artist Residency was hosting seven international artists - Amalia Galdona Broche, Anikó Sáfrán , Maryam Khaleghiyazd, Chelsea Stewart, Lizzie Essi , Margaret R. Thompson and Siddharth Pathak. Below you can see their latest works created during the month in the virtual art program.

During the next days, you can watch the artist talks on IGTV @worldofcoresidency

  • Alex Braidwood – Tuesday (08.12) 17:00 UTC
  • Janine-Annette Littmann – Wednesday (09.12) 17:00 UTC
  • Juan Pablo Medina – Friday (11.12) 17:00 UTC

For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram and Facebook

Online exhibition space

Vol.6, October 2020

This October, the WOC Online Artist Residency was hosting four international artists -Anna Rose, Joshua Unikel, Megan James Goodman, Re Philips. Below you can see their latest works created during the month in the virtual art program.

On Friday, November -nd at 00:00 UTC ( 00am EST and 00am CST) you can watch the artist talk of Name and Name on IGTV @worldofcoresidency

For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram and Facebook

Online Artist Residency
Virtual Exhibition Vol.8
December 2020

During July and August, the WOC Online Artist Residency was hosting five wonderful international artists. During this online exhibition, you will have the chance to enjoy to the artworks created by by Andrea Cardenal, Taline Balian, Kikuko Sakota, Miriam Sagan, Geneva Hutchinson .

Until 25th September, you can see their newly created projects on our website! Stay tuned during the next days and watch the following artist talks on our Instagram page: @worldofcoresidency


For the latest updates follow us on World of Co on Instagram, Facebook and check our website.

Thank the sun every day

for she brings healing

+

power

When I was at my emptiest, I could only be filled by light from her

These are songs that I have found healing and I hope & pray they may do the same for you

PERSONAL MEDITATION PERFORMANCE

WORKS IN PROGRESS – MOVING FORWARD

Good Girl

2021

Honest to Myself

Acrylic on paper

18” x 24”

2021

Honest to Myself

Acrylic on paper

6.9” x 10”

2021

Morning Message

Acrylic on paper

18” x 24”

2021

One Sunny Day of the Summer

Pastel on paper

6.9” x 10”

2021

Sunflower

Acrylic and water-soluble stick on paper

9.7” x 13”

2021

I live on the 600 block of Kathryn Street, in a house I bought 35 years ago. “What is this neighborhood?” I asked the realtor as she drove west, out of the center of town and into an increasingly funky and unfamiliar place.
“A neighborhood you can afford,” she said.
I walked up the steps of the adobe stucco house, and looking through the living room window, had a full blown hallucination. I saw what was obviously a funeral, in full swing.
I better buy this house,I thought. I’m meant to live here my whole life and be buried from it.

***

For years I used to say, “I want to buy an empty lot on Agua Fria.” Agua Fria is the central street of the neighborhood, running east/west, all the way down to the old Spanish village of the same name. I didn’t know why, but I wanted another piece of land. Agua Fria has murals of the Virgin of Guadalupe, and a kind of folly in someone’s front yard. Cement statues and fountains of all kinds fill the space. It has American flags, madonnas, pixies, flowerpots, naked ladies, flamingoes, swans, and cupids. There is also Santa Claus, St. Francis, a dog, a frog, a windmill, angels, and chimes. The sign reads: “The love of this garden reflects the love of Helen’s Beauty.’”At first I assumed this was about Helen of Troy. Then some told me it was the gardener’s wife who had died. At all seasons it is strung with lights.

***

The police shot our neighbor, decades ago, on Hickox Street by the corner of St. Anne’s Church. He was mentally ill, and distraught, threatening to cut himself with a small steak knife. At the end of a long shift on a holiday weekend, a cop shot and killed him. The bullets penetrated the wall of the house a friend of mine was renting. The bullets narrowly missed the bunk beds where the red-headed boys were sleeping. I showed up in shock the next morning around 6 am to check on them and found my friend drinking vodka. I drank a shot myself. A decansos, a memorial, for the deceased sprang up, focused on the stop sign at the corner. Flowers and wreaths and notecards adorned the place where he departed this world. The cop was put on leave, my friend moved and later died, and I lost track of everyone else. Maybe I’m the only one who remembers?

***

The house is just a year or two younger than I am. My neighbor to the north, Gilbert, remembers when he was a toddler and fell into the foundation of what would be my house. It had been raining, and there was standing water. Mrs. Lucero, the across the street neighbor, dashed to pull him out. Gilbert and I are the same age. The house will soon be 70.

***

It was not my funeral that I saw. It was my first husband’s. He, Robert, died as a young man, after surgery. The house was full of people for many days. After he died, a few months later, the forests began to burn. I remember that because he would have been fascinated by the fires, as he knew a lot about the natural world. But he wasn’t there to discuss it with. The Jemez Mountains to the west were volcanic. Now fire covered them, but not a fire that had come from within. The sun turned red at noon Ash started falling on my planters full of pansies. My neighbor, the one whose house was shot up, called and said: “Mir, do you have a valium?” I lied, and said I didn’t.

***

When my mother died, I inherited a share in a piece of property that was contentiously owned by a family group. When it sold, the money confused me. It felt bitter, somehow tainted. Then I realize I could buy an empty lot. And turn it into…a poetry garden with sculpture. I looked all over town. I found an amazing—if scary and overgrown—piece of land that housed a section of the Acequia Madre. That is the central irrigation ditch that runs through town. No one owns it, not the city, not individuals. It is a kid of commons. After many phone calls, I tracked down the elderly man who was the mayor domo in charge of the ditch.”I know that piece of land,” he said. “Don’t buy it. It is cursed. It is good for no one.”

***

I should have realized it wasn’t Helen of Troy. I bet I’m the only person on the westside who cares about Helen of Troy.

***

I bought a different piece of land, one between Agua Fria and the river. Soon after, the entire neighborhood flooded in a hundred years’ storm. For a few years, it was a blank space. There was an abandoned building next to it, and a view of the mountains and the big sky. It was a suburban space, but one that touched on the wild. There was a homeless camp. Boundary lines were unclear. Raccoons, skunks, rabbits, and coyotes crossed it. Of course so did the neighborhood’s raucous crows. Robert Smithson, the father of land art, calls such places the “slurb,” the intersection between the suburban and the wild. Or, between what I call home and the rest of the cosmos.

***

Fire and water. The dead and the living. Earth and air. I do not even need to invoke these muses. They are already present. Here. *** Recently, I passed Gilbert in the street. He called me over to introduce me to another friend. “This is my neighbor, Miriam,” he said. “She’s lived here her whole life.” We both started to laugh. “Well,” I said, “the only part of my life worth living.” And we kept on laughing.

RECLAIM - A RESPONSE TO PURITY CULTURE AND MY ATTEMPT TO HEAL
By Geneva Hutchinson

Arlene Raven, an art historian deeply interested in female empowerment claims that there is “healing through repetition”, I have found this true, especially in my meditation and art process. I have found interest and healing in maximalist vs. minimalist practices, as well as the physical process of creating. Here, you will find my explorations this summer, an attempt to heal and bring healing to others.

Geneva Hutchinson
Interdisciplinary artist, USA

Geneva is a visual artist working in a variety of mediums, such as photography and installation. She received her BFA from Clemson University in South Carolina in 2019 and is currently working towards her MFA at the University of Notre Dame in Indiana. Her work is based around purity culture and sexual assault – and how women cope and deal with this abuse. Her work aims to “RECLAIM”, to reclaim her own mind, body, and power, as well as hopefully provide this empowerment to other survivors.

LABELS
By Andrea Cardenal

This series explores the labels and expectations society places on women; the stereotypes we are pressured to fit into, the roles we are forced to take on, the stigmas associated with words we are sometimes defined by (even mistakenly), and how they can impact us – if we let them. It’s about breaking barriers and empowering women to define who we are and who we want to be ourselves, no matter what others see. It’s about embracing the roles and labels we want for ourselves, and redefining them to fit our multifaceted lives and priorities. These portraits reflect this idea through a combination of realism and abstraction while employing a variety of mediums.

Andrea Cardenal
Painter, USA

Andrea Cardenal is a self-taught, third-generation Latin American artist. She comes from a family of Opera singers, painters, and authors. Born in the USA from a Salvadoran mother and Nicaraguan father, she later moved to El Salvador and grew up in the midst of civil war, after which she lived in 3 continents and traveled to 40+ countries. These experiences give her a unique perspective of different cultures and inspire her practice, giving her art an eclectic feel.

Throughout her life, music and art have been forms of expressing complex emotions. Painting has led to great personal growth and healing. A self-proclaimed “control freak” in her personal life, Andrea uses free-flow styles that allow her to set free expectations and control, embracing imperfection. Spontaneity is at the center of her art, as it expresses personal emotions, contemporary societal issues and explores her thought processes through different techniques, materials and tools used. Her process is instinctive and organic. She creates without judgment as ideas emerge from her subconscious while trying to find harmony within the elements of her creations. She is currently based out of Miami, FL.

Innocence / Young Girl

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with fabric flowers, glue, plastic and acrylic medium.

16” x 20”

This is a portrait of a young, beautiful black girl wearing a crown of flowers. The flowers represent her youth and her blooming into a young woman. She is full of possibilities, dreams and goals.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Bride / Pure

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with fabric, beads, gold foil and acrylic medium.

16” x 20”

This is the portrait of a Hispanic woman looking towards heaven – a woman raised in a society that puts so much of her value on whether she is “pure”, a good Christian girl. She grows up being told that her life’s goal is to be a wife and mother, to serve her husband and children. She is expected to take on a domestic role and be submissive to her husband. But she has her own dreams and goals, and knows that being a wife and mother is only one facet of the great things she will do with her life.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Fragile / Aging Gracefully

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with gloss acrylic medium

16” x 20”

This portrait is of an older woman covered in bubble wrap to represent her frailty or fragility. It is also a representation of the expectation that women must “age gracefully”- maintain their beauty, their figure and their grace despite the natural aging process.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

BOSS

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with broken glass and mirrors

16” x 20”

This portrait represents breaking barriers, the shattered glass represents breaking through the glass ceiling and the mirror is meant to see you reflected in this portrait’s strength. The defiance in her face tells you she will take shit from no one. She is not bossy, she is a boss.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Hot / Stud

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with burnt wax paper and acrylic mediums.

16” x 20”

When doing research for this project, I looked up the words used to describe a promiscuous woman – I was shocked to find more than 60 mostly negative labels. Out of curiosity, I searched for synonyms for promiscuous men, and came across 6 negative labels (less than 10%), a few words taken from women’s labels (like “man-whore” and “male prostitute”, “ladies’ man”, “lady-killer” and “womanizer”), and almost a dozen words that are generally perceived as positive, almost romanticizing promiscuous men: Casanova, Romeo, loverboy, playboy, stud.

Men use these words to flaunt their conquests, while women are shamed -sometimes without even actually being promiscuous at all. Women get labeled whores for sleeping with men they love, while men are proclaimed “Romeos” for using women’s bodies for their own pleasure.

This isn’t meant to be a debate on whether promiscuity is right or wrong in either case. It’s simply commentary on how society treats and judges women vs. their male counterparts.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Ice Queen / Frigid

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with metal scraps, nails, stainless steel jewelry, salt and acrylic mediums.

16” x 20”

This is the counterpart to “Hot” – it’s the portrait of a woman who is perceived as cold, even frigid. Once again, this woman is judged for her demeanor and sexualized even against her will. If women show too much skin, we’re sluts. We cover up, we’re prudes. We are enthusiastic about sex, we’re freaks. We’re not that interested, we’re frigid. As Tova Leigh wrote recently, “women’s bodies are treated and viewed as the problem. Our bodies are either inappropriate or not entertaining enough… and women are put on trial for our sexiness, frigidness, clothing, modesty… essentially blaming women for HAVING A BODY.”

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Mother / Self Portrait

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with plastic scraps, modeling paste and acrylic medium.

16” x 20”

This is the most personal portrait in the series; it’s a reflection of how new motherhood can take over a woman’s life and identity, changing not only how she’s perceived but also how she sees herself and the world around her. The word MOTHER covers my eyes because it’s meant to symbolize that duality; what I see and how I’m seen as a new mother.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Bikini bodies (work in progress)

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with sand and acrylic medium.

16” x 20”

A variety of shapes and sizes – every body is a bikini body.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Woman of Color / Smile (work in progress)

Mixed media – Acrylic on canvas with my grandmother’s costume jewelry, twine and string.

16” x 20”

This is a commentary on how women are expected to be warm and inviting and constantly told to smile. I wanted to make the portrait an African American woman because black women in particular are often perceived as angry and hostile, and this portrait defies that stereotype. She’s smiling, but she’s not smiling for you.

Part of the series “Labels”
This painting is part of a larger series about women, empowerment and overcoming barriers, specifically within the context of breaking free of labels and stereotypes. I represent these themes through a combination of realism, abstraction, and mixed media, pieced together by common symbols and themes.

Untitled
By Kikuko Sakota

I depicted the moments in my day-to-day life during the residency as if I jotted down in the journal but try to add a lyrical touch. As an abstract painter using acrylics in many cases, I attempted to use different materials and style than usual such as pastels, painting in sphere, etc. These are some pieces from my exploration, and my works will be evolving.

Kikuko Sakota
Painter, USA

Kikuko Sakota uses acrylic paints because they are water soluble environment-friendly, dry fast, flexible, and produce great colors. They are similar to water color but they do not melt and mix on the surface so it is possible to apply layers over and over again. She developed abstract style using layers of paints and in some cases using adsorbent. Her attempt is to create transparency and depth by applying thin acrylic layers like pouring and staining and to add subtle nuance by manipulating brush strokes. She is trying to express the landscape in her mind, in other words, the sense of multiple time space passing by. The moments depicted are music, feelings in the heart and mind, and the particular moment in the past and future. She wants viewers to feel something in common with her work so that they can become absorbed and lost in a moment.

Untitled
By Taline Balian

Social media was embraced so fast by most people as it satisfied our human need to belong to an ideal world; It is offering us the possibility to become a polished active character in an imaginary world. The unstoppable growing pressure of belonging to the social media community, is leading its users to look alike; Our organic faces, are being obsessively embellished in order to fit the social media standards.

Experiments 1, 2 and 3 are works in progress, related my research on social media faces and created during the World Of Co two months artist residency.

Taline Balian
Multidisciplinary artist, UAE

Taline Balian is a multidisciplinary visual artist who experiments around Social Media Faces. Through Portraits, she attempts to offer an alternative engaging experience, in the midst of the simulated happiness offered by the virtual platforms, eager to fulfill the viewer’s emotional and immersive needs. Affected by this collective numbness, she was led to hooking even more with the need to do as much as it could possibly be done with her own hands. With the emergence of both organic and synthetic materials, she attempts to fight back against the overflow of the heavy illusion of that polished reality. Since 2016, Taline has joined PACE, a platform for artistic collaboration and experimentation, taking part in the Artist CoLab and Experimental Art in Context. Her work was on display since 1998 in Lebanon, Cairo, Milano, London, Dubai, Abu Dhabi, and New York. In 2019, she took part in the Biennale of Contemporary Art 2019: Universal Data – An exploration of our digital presence at MACAM Modern And Contemporary Art Museum – Lebanon. In 2020, she presented her installation piece This Is Not Immersiveness, on Social Media Addicts who lost their abilities to be immersed at Aisha Alabbar Art Gallery Dubai. Her latest work Social Media Faces (2021) is an interactive video installation commissioned by World Art Dubai 2021.

Poetry Yard
By Miriam Sagan

Miriam Sagan will be opening The Poetry Yard this year, an outside space where sculpture and poetry can be fully experienced. Here is a sneak peak at the first sculpture to go up- a permanent feature of the yard. Made entirely of recycled materials, this land art project helps direct rainfall by incorporating a dry pond. The sculpture’s relationship with the land may change over time- will the wood rot when exposed to water? Or will it remain an ever present reminder of fire and drought? As our climate changes, the sculpture may reflect that change on a local level. Along with the ambiguity and anxiety of climate change, “Desiccation: Dormancy: Deluge” brings up issues of human consumption and how different organisms feed. The sculpture takes inspiration from saprophytic fungi (mushrooms that consume dead wood) and the twin processes of parasitic and symbiotic growth. The plastic and dairy industries are an ambiguous two-edged sword- using unsustainable environmental practices while at the same time greatly expanding human access to food and vital resources. So the question is: how do we achieve a balance between human needs and biological destruction?

Artist’s Statement from Isabel Winson-Sagan

The Poetry Yard is an outdoor art incubator and galley space in Santa Fe, NM USA curated by Miriam Sagan. It opens to the public September 1, 2021.

If you are interested in visiting the Yard or proposing a project, contact us at msagan1035@aol.com

Miriam Sagan
Writer - poet, USA

”I am a poet and writer. My themes are often site specific, and address ecosystems and the Anthropocene. I work in a creative duo, Maternal Mitochodtoa, with my daughter Isabel Winton-Sagan, a multimedia artist. The images are of a work in progress. The piece is: Desiccation: Dormancy: Deluge Made out of recycled materials, this site-specific land art sculpture will be the inaugural piece at a new open-air gallery in Santa Fe called “The Poetry Yard,” a place to celebrate poetry, sculpture, and performance. It is three tree trunks, covered in the bottle caps of baby formula. The poetry text is (there was a triangle) between me, G-d, and the water. Isabel dropped off the first bit and essentially just created the triangle. The words will appear on small metal signs.”